Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Archive

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2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2006: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2007: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2008: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2009: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2010: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2011: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2012: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2013: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2014: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2015: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2016: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2017: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2018: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2019: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2020: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2021: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2022: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2023: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2024: January February March April May June July August September October November December

These featured pictures, as scheduled below, appeared as the picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page in the last 30 days.

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


March 28

Amilcare Ponchielli

Amilcare Ponchielli (1834–1886) was an Italian composer. Born in Paderno Fasolaro (now Paderno Ponchielli) near Cremona, then Kingdom of Lombardy–Venetia, Ponchielli won a scholarship at the age of nine to study music at the Milan Conservatory, writing his first symphony by the time he was ten years old. He is best known for his operas, most notably La Gioconda, the third and most successful version of which debuted at La Scala in Milan on 28 March 1880. The Dance of the Hours from that opera is widely known thanks in part to its use in Walt Disney's Fantasia in 1940 and in Allan Sherman's novelty song "Hello Muddah, Hello Fadduh". In 1881, Ponchielli was appointed the maestro di cappella of Bergamo Cathedral and a professor of composition at the Milan Conservatory, where his pupils included Giacomo Puccini, Pietro Mascagni, Emilio Pizzi, and Giovanni Tebaldini. He was married to the soprano Teresina Brambilla and died at the age of 51 in Milan. This formal photographic portrait of Ponchielli was taken in Milan and is in the archives of the music publisher Casa Ricordi.

Photograph credit: Icilio Calzolari; restored by Adam Cuerden

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March 27

Poster for The Fortune Teller

The Fortune Teller is an operetta in three acts composed by Victor Herbert, with a libretto by Harry B. Smith. After a brief tryout in Toronto, it premiered on Broadway on September 26, 1898, at Wallack's Theatre and ran for 40 performances. The star Alice Nielsen and many of the original company traveled to London, where the piece opened at the Shaftesbury Theatre on April 9, 1901, running for 88 performances. This 1905 poster for The Fortune Teller, depicting eight members of the women's drum corps, was presumably produced for a touring or repertoire production by Nielsen's company.

Poster credit: United States Lithograph Company; restored by Adam Cuerden


March 26

Aerial view of the central shrine of Somapura Mahavihara

Somapura Mahavihara is a Buddhist vihara (monastery) at Paharpur in Badalgachhi, Bangladesh. Built during the reign of the second Pala king Dharmapala (circa 781 to 821), it was one of five great Mahaviharas of the period. It is considered one of the most important archaeological sites in the country and was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1985. This aerial photograph, depicting the structure of the central shrine of Somapura Mahavihara, was taken in 2021.

Photograph credit: Md. Ahsanul Haque Nayem


March 25

Annunciation

The Annunciation is an oil painting by the Early Netherlandish master Jan van Eyck, painted around 1434–1436. Originally on panel, the work was transferred to canvas in the 19th century. It is thought to have been the left (inner) wing of a triptych, although there have been no sightings of the other wings since before 1817. The painting depicts the biblical scene of the Annunciation, in which the Archangel Gabriel announces to the Virgin Mary that she will bear the son of God. The inscription shows his words: AVE GRA PLENA ('Hail, full of grace'). She modestly draws back and responds, ECCE ANCILLA DNI ('Behold the handmaiden of the Lord'); these words appear upside down. The Annunciation is now in the collection of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Painting credit: Jan van Eyck


March 24

Gerty Cori and Carl Ferdinand Cori working in a laboratory

Gerty Cori (1896–1957) was a Czech-American biochemist. She was the third woman to win a Nobel Prize in science, and the first woman to be awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for her significant role in the "discovery of the course of the catalytic conversion of glycogen". Born in Prague, Cori grew up at a time when women were marginalized in science and allowed few educational opportunities, but she nonetheless gained admittance to medical school. With her husband Carl Ferdinand Cori and the Argentine physiologist Bernardo Houssay, she received the Nobel Prize in 1947. This photograph from the Smithsonian Institution Archives, taken in the same year, shows Cori and her husband working in their laboratory.

Photograph credit: unknown; restored by Bammesk


March 23

Tomb of Mian Ghulam Kalhoro

The Tomb of Mian Ghulam Kalhoro is a religious shrine situated in Hyderabad, Pakistan, and the oldest building in the city. It is the burial place of Mian Ghulam Shah Kalhoro, who died in 1772 and is believed to be the founder of Hyderabad, and the second-most important figure in the province of Sindh after Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai. The domed shrine is built inside a rectangular fort, and its interior is decorated with gildings, arc-shaped windows, and tiles. This exterior view of the tomb was photographed in 2020.

Photograph credit: Alexander Savin


March 22

Pomelo

The pomelo (Citrus maxima) is the largest citrus fruit from the family Rutaceae and the principal ancestor of the grapefruit. It is a natural, non-hybrid citrus fruit, native to Southeast Asia. Growing on a tree 5–15 meters (16–50 feet) in height, the fruit is 15–25 cm (6–10 in) in diameter with a usual weight of 1–2 kilograms (2–4 pounds) and has a thicker rind than a grapefruit. It is divided into 11 to 18 segments and its flesh tastes like a mild grapefruit, with little of its common bitterness. The fruit generally contains few, relatively large seeds, but some varieties have numerous seeds.

Photograph credit: Ivar Leidus


March 21

Joseph Fourier

Joseph Fourier (21 March 1768 – 16 May 1830) was a French mathematician and physicist born in Auxerre and best known for initiating the investigation of Fourier series, which eventually developed into Fourier analysis and harmonic analysis, and their applications to problems of heat transfer and vibration. The Fourier transform and Fourier's law of conduction are also named after him. He is also generally credited with the discovery of the greenhouse effect. This engraving of Fourier was drawn by Julien-Léopold Boilly, a French artist noted for his album of lithographs titled Iconographie de l'Institut Royal de France (1820–1821) and his booklet Album de 73 portraits-charge aquarellés des membres de l'Institut (1820), containing watercolor caricatures of seventy-three members of the Institut de France.

Engraving credit: Amédée Felix Barthélémy Geille, after Julien-Léopold Boilly; restored by Bammesk


March 20

Blue-throated macaw

The blue-throated macaw (Ara glaucogularis) is a species of macaw that is endemic to a small area of north-central Bolivia, known as the Llanos de Moxos. Recent population and range estimates suggest that about 350 to 400 individuals remain in the wild. Its demise was brought on by nesting competition, avian predation, and a small native range, exacerbated by indigenous hunting and capture for the pet trade. Although plentiful in captivity, it is critically endangered in the wild and protected by trading prohibitions. In 2014, the species was designated a natural patrimony of Bolivia. This blue-throated macaw in flight was photographed at Loro Parque, on the Spanish island of Tenerife in the Canary Islands.

Photograph credit: Carsten Steger

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March 19

Margaret Harwood

Margaret Harwood (March 19, 1885 – February 6, 1979) was an American astronomer who specialized in photometry, which involved measuring variation in the light of stars and asteroids. In 1916, at 30 years old, Harwood was named director of Maria Mitchell Observatory, and worked there until her retirement in 1957. In 1917, she discovered the asteroid 886 Washingtonia four days before its formal recognition, but was advised not to report it because it would have been inappropriate for a woman to do so. In 1923, she became the first woman to gain access to the Mount Wilson Observatory, and in 1924 was the first woman allowed to use the observatory's 60-inch telescope, the largest in the world at the time. In 1960, an asteroid discovered at Palomar was named in her honor as 7040 Harwood. This photograph of Harwood is in the archives of the Smithsonian Institution.

Photograph credit: unknown; restored by Adam Cuerden


March 18

Saung

The saung, also known as the saung-gauk or the Burmese harp, is an arched harp used in traditional Burmese music. It is regarded as the national musical instrument of Myanmar. It was possibly introduced as early as 500 AD from southeastern India, based on archaeological evidence of Burmese temple reliefs that depict a long-necked harp similar to depictions found in Bengal. The earliest evidence of the saung itself is at the Bawbawgyi Pagoda near present-day Prome. At that site, there is a mid-600s sculptured relief depicting the arched harp with about five strings, appearing with musicians and a dancer. It has survived continuously since that time, and has been mentioned in many texts, pictorial representations and Bagan temples. Burmese chronicles describe harps in ceremonial ensembles at medieval Pagan, and female harpists who performed for royals. This 19th-century saung is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Photograph credit: Metropolitan Museum of Art


March 17

Dark Hedges

The Dark Hedges are an avenue of beech trees near Armoy in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. Planted in the late 18th century for the Gracehill House estate of James Stuart, the trees form an atmospheric "tunnel" and became a tourist attraction after their use as a filming location in the HBO television series Game of Thrones. This photograph of the Dark Hedges was taken in 2016.

Photograph credit: Colin Park


March 16

Agelena labyrinthica

Agelena labyrinthica is a species of spider in the family Agelenidae. It builds a flat-plate surface web connected to a funnel-shaped retreat similar to a labyrinth, typically between low-lying grass and vegetation. These webs can be at ground level, or up to 1.5 metres (5 ft) from the ground. The species is fairly common in Europe, and is typically concentrated in areas near forests and low-lying vegetation, as well as in dry grassland. This female A. labyrinthica spider was photographed in a funnel web in Blankaart Nature Reserve near Diksmuide, Belgium. She has lost one leg, which is trapped in the web.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


March 15

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (March 15, 1933 – September 18, 2020) was an American lawyer and jurist who served as an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1993 until her death in 2020. She was nominated to the Supreme Court by President Bill Clinton to replace retiring justice Byron White, and at the time was generally viewed as a moderate consensus-builder. She eventually became part of the liberal wing of the Supreme Court as the Court shifted to the right over time. Ginsburg was the first Jewish woman and the second woman to serve on the Supreme Court, after Sandra Day O'Connor. During her tenure, Ginsburg wrote notable majority opinions, including United States v. Virginia (1996), Olmstead v. L.C. (1999), Friends of the Earth, Inc. v. Laidlaw Environmental Services, Inc. (2000), and City of Sherrill v. Oneida Indian Nation of New York (2005). This official photographic portrait of Ginsburg was taken by Supreme Court photographer Steve Petteway in 2016.

Photograph credit: Steve Petteway


March 14

One whole and one halved Golden Delicious apple against a black background

Golden Delicious is a cultivar of apple. The cultivar arose from a chance seedling, possibly a hybrid of Grimes Golden and Golden Reinette. The original tree was found on the family farm of J. M. Mullins in Clay County, West Virginia, and was locally known as Mullins' Yellow Seedling. Mullins sold the tree and propagation rights to Stark Brothers Nurseries and Orchards for $5000, which first marketed it as a companion of their Red Delicious in 1914 (although the two cultivars are not closely related). Golden Delicious is one of the fifteen most popular apple cultivars in the United States in 2008, popular for eating as well as in salads, apple sauces, and apple pies. This photograph of one whole and one halved Golden Delicious apple was focus-stacked from six images.

Photograph credit: Ivar Leidus


March 13

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III

The Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III is the third iteration of the flagship camera in the series of OM-D mirrorless interchangeable-lens cameras produced by Olympus on the Micro Four-Thirds system. Released on February 28, 2020, it replaced the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II.

Photograph credit: Petar Milošević


March 12

Rhesus macaque

The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), is a species of Old World monkey native to South, Central, and Southeast Asia. It has the widest geographic range of all non-human primates, occupying a great diversity of altitudes and a great variety of habitats, from grasslands to arid and forested areas, but also close to human settlements. Generally brown or grey in colour, it is 47 to 53 cm (19 to 21 in) in length with a 20.7 to 22.9 cm (8.1 to 9.0 in) tail and weighs 5.3 to 7.7 kg (12 to 17 lb). Due to its wide availability and biological similarity to humans, the rhesus macaque has been used extensively in medical and biological research. It has facilitated breakthroughs including vaccines for rabies, smallpox, polio, and antiretroviral medication to treat HIV/AIDS. A rhesus macaque became the first primate astronaut in 1948, but died during the flight, followed on 14 June 1949 by Albert II, who became the first primate and first mammal in space. This male rhesus macaque, of the subspecies M. m. mulatta, was photographed in the Gokarna Forest, Nepal.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


March 11

Fishing vessel

A fishing vessel is a boat or ship used to catch fish in the sea, lakes and rivers. This picture shows a group of fishing boats lashed together in a tidal creek near the village of Anjarle in Maharashtra, India.

Photograph credit: Sandip Dey


March 10

Mount Ngauruhoe

Mount Ngauruhoe is a volcanic cone in New Zealand. It is the youngest vent in the Tongariro stratovolcano complex on the Central Plateau of the North Island, and first erupted about 2,500 years ago. Ngauruhoe was New Zealand's most active volcano in the 20th century, with 45 eruptions, the most recent in 1977. This panoramic photograph, taken from Mount Tongariro, shows Mount Ngauruhoe and its surroundings, with Mount Ruapehu in the background.

Photograph credit: KennyOMG

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March 9

Marie Stopes

Marie Stopes (1880–1958) was a British author, palaeobotanist, and campaigner for eugenics and women's rights. After obtaining a doctorate from the University of Munich, Stopes was appointed to the faculty of the Victoria University of Manchester, becoming its first female academic. She went on to make significant contributions to plant palaeontology and coal classification, assisting the British government with her coal expertise during World War I. From 1913, Stopes began writing on issues of marriage, parenthood and women's reproductive rights. With her second husband, Humphrey Verdon Roe, she founded the first birth control clinic in Britain. Her sex manual Married Love (1918) was controversial and influential, and brought the subject of birth control into wide public discourse. She was also a believer in eugenics, being described in her biography by June Rose as "an elitist, an idealist, interested in creating a society in which only the best and beautiful should survive". This 1904 photograph shows Stopes at work in her laboratory in Manchester.

Photograph credit: unknown; restored by Adam Cuerden


March 8

Hayden Bridge

The Hayden Bridge is a wrought-iron truss bridge that was manufactured by the Phoenixville Bridge Works in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. It was built in 1882 and was initially located near Corinne, Utah, crossing the Bear River as part of the first transcontinental railroad. In 1901, the bridge was moved more than 1,000 miles (1,600 km) and reassembled at its present location, crossing the McKenzie River in Springfield, Oregon, where it serves as part of the Marcola line for the distribution of lumber. It later closed down due to the closure of the area's lumbermills, until it was converted into a pedestrian bridge in 2019. It is the oldest intact bridge in the state of Oregon. This photograph of the Hayden Bridge was taken as part of a 1990 Historic American Engineering Record survey.

Photograph credit: Historic American Engineering Record; restored by Jeff G. and Bammesk

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March 7

La Wally

La Wally is an opera in four acts by composer Alfredo Catalani, to a libretto by Luigi Illica, first performed at La Scala, Milan, in 1892. The story is set in the Austrian Tyrol where the heroine Wally is in love with Giuseppe Hagenbach. However, her father, Stromminger, wants her to marry Vincenzo Gellner. The opera concludes with Hagenbach and Wally pledging their love for each other, but being killed by an avalanche. La Wally was Catalani's last opera. This 1892 illustration by Adolfo Hohenstein depicts the Act I costume design for the title character Wally.

Painting credit: Adolfo Hohenstein; restored by Adam Cuerden


March 6

Tirumala limniace

Tirumala limniace, also known as the blue tiger, is a butterfly found in South Asia, and Southeast Asia, which belongs to the brush-footed butterfly family, Nymphalidae. It is a large butterfly with a wingspan of 90 to 100 millimeters, with the males being smaller than the females. The upper side of the wing is dark brown to black and patterned with bluish-white, semi-transparent spots and lines. This male blue tiger, of the subspecies T. l. exoticus, was photographed in Kumarakom, in the Indian state of Kerala.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


March 5

Mohawkite

Mohawkite is a rare rock consisting of mixtures of the elements arsenic, silver, nickel and copper, and the mineral skutterudite, with the chemical formula Cu3As up to Cu6As, and the most desirable material was usually found in white quartz matrix. Named after the Mohawk Mine in the Keweenaw Peninsula of the U.S. state of Michigan, where it was originally found, mohawkite has a hardness on the Mohs scale of 3.0 to 3.5 and a metallic luster. The rock's color ranges from brassy yellow to metallic gray, with some specimens having a blue or greenish surface tarnish. This nugget of mohawkite measures about 50 mm × 40 mm × 28 mm (2.0 in × 1.6 in × 1.1 in).

Photograph credit: Heinrich Pniok


March 4

Isambard Kingdom Brunel

Isambard Kingdom Brunel (1806–1859) was an English civil and mechanical engineer. The son of French engineer Marc Isambard Brunel, he worked under his father as an assistant engineer on the Thames Tunnel project for several years until he was seriously injured in a flooding incident. During his recuperation he began a design for a bridge in Bristol, which would later be completed as the Clifton Suspension Bridge. In 1833, Brunel was appointed chief engineer of the Great Western Railway, overseeing development of the main line from London to Bristol which was completed in 1841. Brunel's other achievements included the design of the first transatlantic steamship and dockyards. This 1857 photograph, titled Isambard Kingdom Brunel Standing Before the Launching Chains of the Great Eastern, was taken by Robert Howlett. It depicts Brunel standing before a drum of chain used during the launching of SS Great Eastern at Millwall in London; he carries a cigar case, and his boots and trousers are muddy.

Photograph credit: Robert Howlett; restored by Bammesk


March 3

Woman Suffrage Procession

The Woman Suffrage Procession was a suffragist parade held in Washington, D.C., on March 3, 1913, the day before Woodrow Wilson's first presidential inauguration. It was organized by Alice Paul for the National American Woman Suffrage Association. Thousands of suffragists marched down Pennsylvania Avenue "in a spirit of protest against the present political organization of society, from which women are excluded". The march and the attention it attracted were important in advancing women's suffrage in the United States. This image shows the front cover of the official program of the Woman Suffrage Procession, illustrated by Benjamin Moran Dale. It depicts an elaborately dressed woman blowing a trumpet with a "Votes for Women" banner while riding on horseback in front of the United States Capitol.

Illustration credit: Benjamin Moran Dale; restored by Adam Cuerden


March 2

Romanesco broccoli

Romanesco broccoli is an edible flower bud of the species Brassica oleracea. It is chartreuse in color, and has a form naturally approximating a fractal. When compared to a traditional cauliflower, it has a firmer texture and delicate, nutty flavor.

Photograph credit: Ivar Leidus


March 1

Port Hills

The Port Hills are a range of hills in the Canterbury Region of New Zealand, so named because they lie between the city of Christchurch and its port at Lyttelton. The hills are an eroded remnant of the Lyttelton volcano, which erupted millions of years ago. Starting at Godley Head, the range runs approximately east–west along the northern side of Lyttelton Harbour and thence to the south, terminating near Gebbies Pass above the head of the harbour. It includes a number of summits between 300 and 500 metres (980 and 1,640 feet) above sea level. This photograph shows a panoramic view of the Port Hills from Mount Ada, looking towards Lyttelton Harbour in the distance.

Photograph credit: Michal Klajban


February 28

Katherine Johnson

Katherine Johnson (1918–2020) was an African-American mathematician whose calculations of orbital mechanics as a NASA employee were critical to the success of U.S. crewed spaceflights. During her 33-year career at NASA and its predecessor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, she earned a reputation for mastering complex manual calculations and helped the space agency pioneer the use of computers to perform tasks. She worked with the Apollo program, calculating rendezvous paths for the lunar lander and command module on its flights to the Moon. Johnson's calculations were essential to the beginning of the Space Shuttle program and she also worked on plans for a mission to Mars. In 2015, President Barack Obama awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom, as a pioneering example of African-American women in STEM. She was portrayed by Taraji P. Henson as a lead character in the 2016 film Hidden Figures. This NASA photographic portrait of Johnson was taken in 1983.

Photograph credit: NASA


February 27

Blue-billed duck

The blue-billed duck (Oxyura australis) is a small Australian stiff-tailed duck, with both the male and female growing to a length of 40 centimetres (16 in). The male has a slate-blue bill which changes to bright-blue during the breeding season, which gives the duck its common name. The male has deep chestnut plumage during breeding season, reverting to a dark grey. The female retains black plumage with brown tips all year round. The duck is endemic to Australia's temperate regions, inhabiting natural inland wetlands and also artificial wetlands, such as sewage ponds, in large numbers. It can be difficult to observe due to its cryptic nature during its breeding season through autumn and winter. The male duck exhibits a complex mating ritual. The species is omnivorous, with a preference for small aquatic invertebrates. This male blue-billed duck was photographed near Penrith, New South Wales, in 2020.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


Picture of the day archives and future dates

2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2006: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2007: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2008: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2009: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2010: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2011: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2012: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2013: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2014: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2015: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2016: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2017: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2018: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2019: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2020: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2021: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2022: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2023: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2024: January February March April May June July August September October November December