Longacre Theatre

Coordinates: 40°45′37″N 73°59′09″W / 40.76028°N 73.98583°W / 40.76028; -73.98583
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Longacre Theatre
The Prom, 2019
Map
Address220 West 48th Street
Manhattan, New York
United States
Coordinates40°45′37″N 73°59′09″W / 40.76028°N 73.98583°W / 40.76028; -73.98583
OwnerThe Shubert Organization
TypeBroadway theatre
Capacity1,077
Construction
OpenedMay 1, 1913
Years active1913–1942, 1953–present
ArchitectHenry Beaumont Herts
Website
shubert.nyc/theatres/longacre/
DesignatedDecember 8, 1987[1]
Reference no.1348[1]
Designated entityFacade
DesignatedDecember 8, 1987[2]
Reference no.1349[2]
Designated entityAuditorium interior

The Longacre Theatre is a Broadway theater at 220 West 48th Street in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States. Opened in 1913, it was designed by Henry B. Herts and was named for Longacre Square, now known as Times Square. The Longacre has 1,077 seats and is operated by The Shubert Organization. Both the facade and the auditorium's interior are New York City designated landmarks.

The ground-floor facade is made of rusticated blocks of terracotta. The theater's main entrance is shielded by a marquee. The upper stories are divided vertically into five bays, which contain niches on either side of three large windows. The auditorium contains ornamental plasterwork, a sloped orchestra level, two balconies, and a coved ceiling. The balcony level contains box seats topped by flat arches, and the proscenium opening is also a flat arch. In addition, the Longacre contains two lounges, and the top story formerly had offices.

Theatrical personality Harry Frazee acquired the site in 1911 and developed the Longacre Theatre to accommodate musicals. The Longacre opened on May 1, 1913, with the play Are You a Crook?, but the theater housed several flops in its early years. Frazee, who co-owned the theater with G. M. Anderson, sold his ownership stake in 1917 to focus on baseball. The Shubert brothers acquired the Longacre in 1924 and operated it for two decades before leasing it as a radio and television studio in 1944. The Shuberts returned the Longacre to legitimate theatrical use in 1953. The theater gained a reputation for hosting few successful productions in the late 20th century and was nearly converted to a court in the early 1990s. The Longacre was renovated in 2008.

Site[edit]

The Longacre Theatre is on 220 West 48th Street, on the south sidewalk between Eighth Avenue and Broadway, near Times Square in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City.[3][4] The square land lot covers 9,990 square feet (928 m2), with a frontage of about 100 feet (30 m) on 48th Street and a depth of 100 feet.[4] The Longacre shares the block with the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre to the west, the Ethel Barrymore Theatre to the south, and the Morgan Stanley Building to the east. Other nearby buildings include the Eugene O'Neill Theatre and Walter Kerr Theatre to the north; Crowne Plaza Times Square Manhattan to the northeast; 20 Times Square to the east; the Hotel Edison and Lunt-Fontanne Theatre to the south; and the Lena Horne Theatre and Paramount Hotel to the southwest.[4]

Before the Longacre Theatre was developed, the surrounding area generally had a mixture of low-rise residences and industrial buildings.[5][6] The site of the Longacre Theatre was previously occupied by a row of four residences, each of which was three stories high.[5] At the time of the theater's construction, the site to the east contained a carriage factory, while the Union Methodist Church was across 48th Street.[7]

Design[edit]

The Longacre Theatre was designed by Henry B. Herts and constructed for baseball personality Harry Frazee.[3][8] Herts had designed several Broadway theaters with his partner Hugh Tallant, including the New Amsterdam Theatre and Lyceum Theatre, but the partnership dissolved in the early 1910s. The Longacre was one of the first Broadway theaters that Herts designed alone.[8]

Facade[edit]

Main entrance

The main elevation of the facade faces north on 48th Street and is arranged symmetrically with classical French details.[9] Early news articles about the theater described it as having a facade of gray limestone and terracotta,[10][11][12] with the terracotta pieces being painted in several colors.[13][14] A contemporary New-York Tribune article compared the theater to the Whitehall Palace,[11] while a New York Times article said the theater's exterior "gives a cheerful touch of snap and cheer to the old-time structures formerly characteristic of this block".[13] The west and east elevations contain brick walls with window openings and fire escapes.[15]

At ground level along 48th Street, there is a water table made of granite, above which are rusticated blocks of terracotta. The ground level contains five doorways, separated by sign boards. The three center openings are each approached by a single step; each opening contains a metal-and-glass double door topped by a transom. On either side of the central doors is a recessed doorway containing metal double doors. A frieze decorated with foliate moldings, as well as a horizontal band with facets, runs above the first floor. Above all of these openings is a metal marquee.[9] The stage door is to the left of the main entrance doors.[16] According to early photographs, the ground-floor facade was originally composed of colored terracotta tiles, the color of which complemented the upper stories.[14]

The upper stories are divided into five bays, separated by fluted pilasters. The lower section of each pilaster contains a floral decoration, an urn, and a niche with a female statue personifying Drama; the statues hold masks and scrolls. The pilasters are topped by Corinthian-style capitals.[9] The three inner bays (directly above the marquee) contain double-height openings, each with a window and a transom bar that is divided horizontally into three sections. The bottoms of each window contain sills with brackets and reeded panels, while the spaces above contain curved pediments.[17] A triangular sign is placed over the center window.[15][18] The outermost two bays contain paneling, as well as corbels that support empty niches.[9] Large billboards were originally hung over the outermost bays.[18]

Niche in one of the outer bays
Window in one of the center bays
Windows in the attic

Near the top of each bay, between the pilasters' capitals, is a frieze panel in each bay. Each panel consists of an oval plaque, which is flanked by circular medallions with scallop and mask motifs. Above this, an entablature wraps across the width of the facade; it contains fluted tiles on either side of an inscription with the words "The Longacre Theatre". The entablature is topped by a cornice with modillions and lions' heads. Above the cornice is an attic story with two recessed sash windows in each bay. The interiors of the recessed window openings are decorated with medallions and foliate motifs. The attic story's bays are separated by projecting pilasters with urns and foliate decoration. There is an architrave and a parapet just below the roof.[15]

Interior[edit]

The theater was intended to be fireproof, with stone, brick, steel, terracotta, and reinforced concrete being used in its construction.[10][11] The auditorium has an orchestra level, two balconies, boxes and a stage behind the proscenium arch. The auditorium's width is slightly greater than its depth, and the space is designed with plaster decorations in relief.[19] The Longacre's operator The Shubert Organization cites the auditorium as having 1,077 seats;[20][21] meanwhile, Playbill cites 1,045 seats[16] and The Broadway League cites 1,091 seats.[22] These are divided into 508 in the orchestra, 304 in the first balcony, 249 in the second balcony, and 16 in the boxes.[20] The 1,077-seat capacity dates to a 2008 renovation, when 18 seats were removed to improve wheelchair accessibility and sight lines.[21] The orchestra level is wheelchair-accessible via the main doors; the balcony levels are primarily accessed by steps, but there is a small wheelchair lift.[20]

The original color scheme contained Roman gold, with topaz carpets, wisteria seats, and gold draperies.[10][23] Though the decorative scheme was described in one source as "extremely simple",[7][23] the decorative motifs that did exist were highly elaborate, and some motifs were repeated multiple times.[23] The auditorium's current color scheme, which consists of gold and green hues, dates to 2008.[21]

The theater's lobby was originally decorated in gray-green colors, with highlights of gold and serpentine marble.[10][11][12] The dressing rooms behind the stage are completely insulated from the auditorium by a heavy steel wall.[10][12] In addition, Frazee's offices were placed above the auditorium.[10][11] In a 2008 renovation, a 1,600-square-foot (150 m2) basement lounge was excavated, and the attic was turned into an upper lounge with a bar and bathrooms.[21]

Seating areas[edit]

The interior, seen around 1910–1915

The rear of the orchestra contains a promenade. The rear wall of the promenade and the side walls of the orchestra contain plasterwork paneling, as well as doorways with eared frames. The promenade ceiling has molded ribs.[24] Staircases with wrought-iron railings lead from the promenade to the balcony levels.[19] The orchestra is raked, sloping down toward an orchestra pit in front of the stage.[25] The front walls of the auditorium curve inward toward the proscenium opening.[25] The ground floor formerly had three boxes near the proscenium.[23]

Promenades also exist behind both balcony levels. The balcony walls have similar plasterwork paneling and eared doorway frames to the orchestra level. An entablature runs atop the front portion of the second balcony's walls; it wraps above the boxes on both sides of the auditorium, as well as above the proscenium arch.[24] There are light fixtures and air conditioning vents underneath both balcony levels, as well as a technical booth behind the second balcony's rear wall.[26] The balcony fronts were originally decorated with plasterwork swags and fleurettes.[18] The ornamentation on the undersides and front railings of both balconies was removed at some point after the theater's opening,[24] then restored in 2008.[21] The balconies are shallow and placed at a low height, a deliberate design choice that brought these seats closer to the stage.[23]

On either side of the proscenium is one curved box at the first balcony level. The boxes are housed within flat-arched openings.[15] As with the balconies, the boxes' fronts were originally decorated with plasterwork swags and fleurettes,[18] but the original ornamentation on the boxes' undersides and front railings was removed after the theater's opening.[24] The boxes' ornamentation was also restored in 2008.[21] Above each box is an entablature with foliate motifs and a cornice with dentils. An Adam-style band surrounds each box's arch. In addition, there is an oval medallion depicting a helmet and shield, which interrupts the Adam-style band.[24]

Other design features[edit]

Next to the boxes is a flat proscenium arch.[25] The inner edge of the archway contains a molded band of shells. A wider band with foliate and latticework motifs also surrounds the archway.[24] News sources from 1913 describe the band being made of gold and "breccia violet marble".[10][12] Above the center of the arch is a cartouche, which is decorated with foliate motifs; the cartouche overlaps both the wide band and the entablature above it. The entablature is decorated with helmets and symbols of laurel bands, spears, and shields.[24] The proscenium measures 34 feet 10 inches (10.62 m) high and 35 feet 0 inches (10.67 m) wide. The depth of the auditorium to the proscenium is 29 feet 7 inches (9.02 m), while the depth to the front of the stage is 32 feet 3 inches (9.83 m).[20] The stage measures 70 feet (21 m) wide and either 36 feet (11 m)[11][12] or 46 feet (14 m) deep.[10]

The ceiling is slightly coved at its edges, though the rest of the ceiling is flat.[25] A coved, molded band separates the ceiling into front and rear sections. A wide panel containing cartouches, foliate decoration, and latticework is placed at the front of the ceiling.[24] Two chandeliers hang from either side of this panel.[26] The rear section of the ceiling is semicircular and is surrounded by a band with foliate decorations.[24]

History[edit]

Times Square became the epicenter for large-scale theater productions between 1900 and the Great Depression.[27] Manhattan's theater district had begun to shift from Union Square and Madison Square during the first decade of the 20th century.[28][29] From 1901 to 1920, forty-three theaters were built around Broadway in Midtown Manhattan, including the Longacre Theatre.[30] Harry Frazee was a theatrical personality (and later a baseball executive) from Peoria, Illinois, who entered the industry as a 16-year-old theater usher in 1896. Frazee subsequently moved to Chicago, operating theaters and producing several shows.[31][32]

Development and early years[edit]

Illuminated sign

In late 1911, the lots at 220 to 228 West 48th Street were sold to Frazee and George W. Lederer.[33][34] The site would be redeveloped with a theater known as the Longacre, after Times Square's former name. Several architects had already proposed designs for the theater.[34] By January 1912, Henry B. Herts had been selected as the architect,[7][35] and he filed plans for the theater that month with the New York City Department of Buildings.[36] Frazee planned to house his own musicals at the Longacre.[14][37] Construction started in May 1912 at an estimated cost of $150,000.[14] By August 1912, the theater was reportedly near completion and scheduled to open that October.[38][39] The opening was then delayed to November,[40] and the scaffolding in front of the theater was disassembled by October.[41] The theater's completion stalled due to "strikes and contractors' difficulties",[42] including the bankruptcy of a contractor.[43] Philip Bartholomae made an unsuccessful offer of $400,000 for the theater in December 1912,[44] and work resumed shortly afterward.[43] The delays nearly doubled the cost to $275,000.[14]

The Longacre opened on May 1, 1913, with Are You a Crook?, a farce about criminals[45][46] that closed after 12 performances.[47][48] It was one of nine theaters to open in Times Square during the 1912–1913 theatrical season.[49] The musical Adele, which opened in August 1913, was much more successful.[47][50] The Longacre hosted several flops afterward.[51] In April 1914, the theater went into foreclosure to satisfy an outstanding mortgage of $70,000,[14][52] though the foreclosure proceeding was subsequently withdrawn.[53][54] The same year, the Longacre hosted the melodrama A Pair of Sixes,[55] which lasted 188 performances,[56][57] and the farce Kick In with John Barrymore,[58] which had 207 total performances.[56][59] During 1915, the Longacre's productions included Inside the Lines with Lewis Stone,[60][61] A Full House with May Vokes,[60][62] and The Great Lover with Leo Ditrichstein.[47][63]

In April 1916, Frazee and G. M. Anderson bought the Longacre Theatre; previously, they had leased it from Pincus and Goldstone.[64] The Longacre's next hit was Nothing but the Truth, which opened in 1916[65] and starred William Collier Sr. for 332 performances.[60][66] In November 1916, during the run of Nothing but the Truth, Frazee sold his interest in the Longacre to Anderson, L. Lawrence Weber, and F. Ray Comstock.[67][68] Frazee wished to focus on managing the Boston Red Sox, which he had just acquired.[67] The Longacre then hosted two popular shows in the late 1910s.[47] Guy Bolton, Jerome Kern, and P. G. Wodehouse provided music for the intimate musical Leave It to Jane in 1917,[69][70] while Bolton and George Middleton collaborated on Adam and Eva in 1919.[71][72]

1920s to early 1940s[edit]

The Longacre hosted Pitter Patter with William T. Kent in 1920[73][74] and The Champion with Grant Mitchell the next year.[73][75] Ethel Barrymore then leased the theater in June 1922,[76][77] appearing in three plays there: Rose Bernd, Romeo and Juliet, and The Laughing Lady.[51] Another hit in 1923 was Little Jessie James, with music by Harry Archer and Harlan Thompson,[47][78] which ran for 385 performances.[79][80] The Shubert brothers acquired the Longacre in May 1924 for $600,000.[81][82] William B. Friedlander and Con Conrad wrote the music for two of the Longacre's next works: Moonlight[83][84][85] and Mercenary Mary.[83][86][87] Also in 1925, George S. Kaufman produced The Butter and Egg Man,[88][89][90] the only play Kaufman wrote without collaborating.[37] The Longacre then staged An American Tragedy in 1926,[88][91] featuring Morgan Farley and Miriam Hopkins for 216 performances,[92][93] and the comedy The Command to Love the next year, which ran for 236 performances.[92][94]

The Longacre's offerings in the late 1920s included Jarnegan with Richard and Joan Bennett,[95][96] Hawk Island with Clark Gable,[95][97] and A Primer for Lovers with Alison Skipworth.[98][99] In general, the Longacre did not hold any long runs in 1930 or 1931.[98] The shows during this time included The Matriarch in 1930 with Constance Collier and Jessica Tandy,[100][101] as well as Nikki in 1931 with Fay Wray.[100][102] The next hit came in 1932, when Blessed Event opened with Roger Pryor.[103][104] The Longacre then staged Nine Pine Street,[105][106] and Wednesday's Child.[105][107] The Longacre hosted many flops during the Great Depression, sometimes with a several-month gap between productions.[108] In March 1935, the Group Theatre premiered Clifford Odets's Till the Day I Die and Waiting for Lefty,[103][109] which starred Odets, Elia Kazan, and Lee J. Cobb for 135 performances.[110][111] That December, the Group Theatre staged Paradise Lost, another Odets play, at the Longacre.[103][112][113]

The Works Progress Administration (WPA)'s Federal Theatre Project had planned to rent the Longacre in 1936, but the WPA rescinded its plan due to protests from stagehand unions.[114] Artef, a Yiddish theatre group, was also negotiating for the Longacre.[115] The Longacre's productions during this time included a Hedda Gabler revival with Alla Nazimova,[116][117][118] followed by The Lady Has a Heart with Elissa Landi.[119][120] The Longacre hosted Paul Osborn's On Borrowed Time in 1938,[121][122] which ran for 321 performances.[119][123] Another Osborn play, Morning's at Seven in 1939,[124] had a 44-performance run at the Longacre[119][125] (though its 1980 Broadway revival was far more successful).[121] In the early 1940s, the Longacre was generally filled by productions with less than 100 performances.[126] The major exception to this was Three's a Family, which opened in 1943[127][128] and ran for 497 performances.[129][130]

Mid-1940s to 1960s[edit]

Entrance

By April 1944, the Shuberts were planning to relocate Three Is a Family so the Longacre could be leased to the Mutual Broadcasting System (MBS) for use as a broadcast studio.[131] The next month, MBS signed a five-year lease.[132][133] A year after moving into the theater, MBS added some offices on the Longacre's top story to alleviate crowding at its other buildings.[134] The Longacre also served as the home of AM radio station WOR, which used the theater for shows like Broadway Talks Back,[110] as well as The American Forum of the Air starting in 1947.[135] The Longacre was the only MBS studio that allowed audiences, but WOR (which was operated by MBS) did not allow audiences at its broadcasts.[136] Because the theater was being used as a studio, the Shuberts refused to comply with a 1948 ordinance that would have required any theater showing legitimate plays to give 2 percent of profits to the city government.[137] By 1949, as a result of a shortage of studios in New York City, MBS rival CBS had started broadcasting This is Broadway from the Longacre.[138]

Ultimately, the Longacre was used as a radio and television studio for nine and a half years.[127] The Broadway theatre industry had improved by mid-1953, when a shortage of available theaters prompted the Shuberts to return the Longacre to legitimate productions.[139] The first production at the newly reopened Longacre was Dorothy Parker and Arnaud d'Usseau's Ladies of the Corridor, which opened in October 1953.[140][141] Ladies of the Corridor was not a success,[142] and neither was Jean Anouilh's Mademoiselle Colombe in 1954.[143][144] More successful was Lillian Hellman's version of Anouilh's The Lark,[145] which opened in 1955[146] and featured Julie Harris, Boris Karloff, and Christopher Plummer.[127][147] This was followed in 1957 by Fair Game, which featured Sam Levene and Ellen Burstyn.[148][149] Another hit at the Longacre was Samuel Taylor's 1958 comedy The Pleasure of His Company, which featured Cornelia Otis Skinner, Walter Abel, Dolores Hart, George Peppard, Cyril Ritchard, and Charlie Ruggles.[127][150]

Eugène Ionesco's Rhinoceros opened at the Longacre in 1961 and featured Zero Mostel.[127][151][152] A transfer of Ossie Davis's Purlie Victorious followed at the end of the same year.[149][153] The Longacre also hosted Henry Denker's A Case of Libel in 1963, with Sidney Blackmer, Larry Gates, and Van Heflin,[127][154] followed in 1964 by Lorraine Hansberry's The Sign in Sidney Brustein's Window with Gabriel Dell and Rita Moreno.[127][155][156] In 1966, the theater hosted a short run of Tennessee Williams's Slapstick Tragedy[157] (composed of The Mutilated and The Gnadiges Fraulein),[158][159] Hal Holbrook's solo show Mark Twain Tonight!,[149][160] and a solo appearance by Gilbert Bécaud.[161][162] Holbrook, Teresa Wright, and Lillian Gish starred in Robert Anderson's play Never Sang for My Father at the Longacre in 1968.[127][163] The National Theatre of the Deaf also performed at the Longacre for a limited engagement in 1969.[149][164]

1970s and 1980s[edit]

Viewed from the west

William Goldman's 1969 book The Season: A Candid Look at Broadway had specifically cited the Longacre as a flop theater.[165] Goldman wrote that the Longacre was not near many other theaters, especially as compared with venues on 45th Street, and claimed that the Longacre hosted weak shows because its owners "could only get dreck to play there".[166] According to theatrical historian Louis Botto, this reinforced "the notion that no hits open there", creating a cycle of flops in the early 1970s.[165] Some productions during this time, such as Keep Off the Grass (1972), limited the audience to 499 because a 500-seat house would require negotiations with Broadway theatrical unions.[167] The Longacre finally saw a hit in 1975 with the opening of The Ritz,[168][169] which featured Moreno, Jerry Stiller, and Jack Weston for 400 performances.[170] Julie Harris starred in the solo The Belle of Amherst in 1976.[171][172][173] This was followed by revivals of No Man's Land,[174][175][176] The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel,[171][177][178] and Jesus Christ Superstar.[110][179] At some point during the 1970s, the interior was painted over in a cream color.[21]

In 1978, the Fats Waller revue Ain't Misbehavin' opened at the Longacre,[168][180] ultimately seeing 1,604 performances over three theaters.[181][182] The Longacre's next hit was Children of a Lesser God with Phyllis Frelich and John Rubinstein, which opened in 1980[183][184] and had 887 performances.[182][185] The Longacre often remained dark for several consecutive months during the 1980s,[186] and a 1987 New York Times article reported that the theater had been empty for 201 of the past 208 weeks.[187] Shows during the decade included Passion,[188][189] Play Memory,[182][190] Harrigan 'N Hart,[191][192] A Day in the Death of Joe Egg,[193][194] Precious Sons,[195][196] The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940,[197][195] Don't Get God Started,[195][198] and Hizzoner!.[195][199] A video for the song The Rum Tum Tugger, from the musical Cats, was also shot at the Longacre during one of its dark periods in 1984.[200] During the late 1980s, the Shuberts renovated the Longacre as part of a restoration program for their Broadway theaters.[201]

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) had started considering protecting the Longacre as a landmark in 1982,[202] with discussions continuing over the next several years.[203] The LPC designated the Longacre's facade and interior as a landmark on December 8, 1987.[204][205] This was part of the LPC's wide-ranging effort in 1987 to grant landmark status to Broadway theaters.[206] The New York City Board of Estimate ratified the designations in March 1988.[207] The Shuberts, the Nederlanders, and Jujamcyn collectively sued the LPC in June 1988 to overturn the landmark designations of 22 theaters, including the Longacre, on the merit that the designations severely limited the extent to which the theaters could be modified.[208] The lawsuit was escalated to the New York Supreme Court and the Supreme Court of the United States, but these designations were ultimately upheld in 1992.[209]

1990s to present[edit]

Side view of sign on the facade

The Longacre hosted the musical Truly Blessed, a showcase of Mahalia Jackson's music, for a month in 1990.[210] No other shows had been staged when, in November 1991, the city and state government officials proposed setting up a community courtroom in the theater to process misdemeanor summonses.[211][212][213] The Shubert Organization was to donate the space for three years.[211] Theatrical personalities heavily opposed the plan, not only because it would require extensive renovations, but also because another Broadway house (the Mark Hellinger Theatre) had been converted to non-theatrical use.[214] Another site for the court was eventually identified,[215][a] and the Longacre returned to legitimate use with a short run of Tango Pasion in April 1993.[216] Frank D. Gilroy's Any Given Day also had a short run of 32 performances the same year.[195][217] A revival of Medea with Diana Rigg was hosted in 1994,[195][218] followed by a short run of Phillip Hayes Dean's Paul Robeson with Avery Brooks in 1995.[219][220]

Horton Foote's The Young Man from Atlanta opened at the Longacre in 1997,[221][222] followed by David Henry Hwang's Golden Child the next year.[223][224] The Longacre then hosted The Gershwins' Fascinating Rhythm in April 1999[225][226] and John Pielmeier's Voices in the Dark that August.[227][228] In 2001, the Longacre hosted two brief runs:[22][229] Judgment at Nuremberg[230][231] and A Thousand Clowns.[232][233] The musical One Mo' Time ran for only three weeks in 2002,[234][235] while Russell Simmons Def Poetry Jam opened later that year and ran six months.[236][237] As part of a settlement with the United States Department of Justice in 2003, the Shuberts agreed to improve disabled access at their 16 landmarked Broadway theaters, including the Longacre.[238][239] The Longacre then had two major flops: The Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All (2003), which closed after one performance,[229][240] and Prymate (2004), which lasted five performances.[229][241] A revival of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? opened in 2005,[242][243] followed by a transfer of the off-Broadway hit Well in 2006.[244][245] The Longacre had no productions for about a year[229] until Talk Radio opened in March 2007.[246][247]

After Talk Radio ended, the Longacre was closed for a $12 million renovation by Kostow Greenwood Architects. The marquee was replaced and the climate control system was refurbished. The interior spaces were extensively rebuilt with new seats and lounges, as well as restored decorations, including an approximation of the original color scheme. Original decorative elements, removed in previous renovations, were restored to the balcony and boxes.[21] The theater reopened in May 2008 with the farce Boeing Boeing,[248] which ran until the following January;[249][250] Boeing Boeing's 279-performance run was the longest of any production at the Longacre in almost three decades.[229] The next hit was Burn the Floor, which opened in August 2009[251][252] and ran for five months.[253]

Productions in the early 2010s included La Cage aux Folles in 2010, Chinglish in 2011, Magic/Bird and The Performers in 2012, First Date the Musical in 2013, and Of Mice and Men and You Can't Take It with You in 2014. This was followed by the musicals Allegiance in 2015, A Bronx Tale in 2016, The Prom in 2018, and The Lightning Thief in 2019.[16][22] A Bronx Tale achieved the box office record for the theater, grossing $1,293,125.32 over nine performances for the week ending January 1, 2017.[254] During the run of The Prom, in 2019, Broadway's first known onstage wedding happened at the Longacre between two women.[255][256] On March 12, 2020, the theater closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[257] It reopened on November 2, 2021, with previews of Diana,[258] which ran seven weeks.[259] A limited revival of the play Macbeth opened in April 2022,[260][261] followed by the play Leopoldstadt in October 2022.[262][263] The Broadway transfer of the musical Lempicka, based on the life of Tamara de Lempicka, will open at the theater on April 14, 2024.[264][265]

Notable productions[edit]

Productions are listed by the year of their first performance. This list only includes Broadway shows; it does not include programs broadcast from there.[16][22]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Now the Midtown Community Court on 54th Street

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 1.
  2. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 1.
  3. ^ a b White, Norval; Willensky, Elliot; Leadon, Fran (2010). AIA Guide to New York City (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. p. 301. ISBN 978-0-19538-386-7.
  4. ^ a b c "220 West 48 Street, 10036". New York City Department of City Planning. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  5. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 11.
  6. ^ Henderson, Mary C. (2004). The City and the Theatre: The History of New York Playhouses : a 250 Year Journey from Bowling Green to Times Square. Back Stage Books. p. 187. ISBN 978-0-8230-0637-3.
  7. ^ a b c "Latest Theatre for Times Square District". The New York Times. January 28, 1912. p. XX3. ISSN 0362-4331. ProQuest 97295360.
  8. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 8–9.
  9. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 16.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h "Longacre Theatre Ready; " Are You a Crook?" at Newest Playhouse on Thursday". The New York Times. April 28, 1913. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  11. ^ a b c d e f "The Longacre Theatre: An "Intimate" Playhouse of the Most Modern Design". New-York Tribune. April 20, 1913. p. B6. ProQuest 575085491.
  12. ^ a b c d e "A New Theatre for E.H. Frazee". The Sun. April 20, 1913. p. 73. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  13. ^ a b "Building of Theatres Still Continues; Some Beautiful New Playhouses to Open Their Doors Soon – Many Others in Prospect". The New York Times. September 8, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  14. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 12.
  15. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 17.
  16. ^ a b c d "Longacre Theatre". Playbill. September 22, 2021. Retrieved November 18, 2021.
  17. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 16–17.
  18. ^ a b c d Morrison, William (1999). Broadway Theatres: History and Architecture. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications. p. 95. ISBN 0-486-40244-4.
  19. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 17–18.
  20. ^ a b c d "Longacre Theatre". Shubert Organization. Retrieved November 18, 2021.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h Collins, Glenn (May 3, 2008). "On Broadway, Revivals Aren't Only for Shows". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  22. ^ a b c d The Broadway League. "Longacre Theatre – New York, NY". IBDB. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  23. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 13.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 18.
  25. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 17.
  26. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 19.
  27. ^ Swift, Christopher (2018). "The City Performs: An Architectural History of NYC Theater". New York City College of Technology, City University of New York. Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  28. ^ "Theater District –". New York Preservation Archive Project. Archived from the original on October 19, 2021. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  29. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 2.
  30. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 4.
  31. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 7.
  32. ^ "H.H. Frazee Dies Suddenly at 48; Famous Theatre and Baseball Man Expires—Mayor With Him at End". The New York Times. June 5, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  33. ^ "The Real Estate Field; Morrell Estate Sells the Corner of Fourth Avenue and Thirty-second Street for Over a Half Million – Builders Buy on Upper Park Avenue – Big Bronx Deal". The New York Times. September 20, 1911. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  34. ^ a b "Below 59th Street". The Real Estate Record: Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide. Vol. 88, no. 2271. September 23, 1911. p. 417 – via columbia.edu.
  35. ^ "Theatres". The Real Estate Record: Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide. Vol. 89, no. 2289. January 27, 1912. p. 195 – via columbia.edu.
  36. ^ "The Real Estate Field; Big Apartment for Block Hitherto Restricted to Private Dwellings in Sherman Square Section – Irish House of Lords for a Theatre – The Beverley Sold". The New York Times. January 26, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  37. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 151.
  38. ^ "Frazee Has New Plays: His Longacre Theatre, in 48th Street, Approaches Completion". New-York Tribune. August 31, 1912. p. 9. ProQuest 574960001.
  39. ^ "Frazee's New Comedy". Variety. Vol. 27, no. 9. August 2, 1912. p. 11. ProQuest 1529303411.
  40. ^ "Lake Steamer Sinks; Crew Saved". The New York Times. September 28, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  41. ^ "Twenty New Theatres for New York This Year". The Sun. October 27, 1912. p. 55. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  42. ^ "New Longacre Theatre to Open". The New York Times. April 11, 1913. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  43. ^ a b Richardson, Leander (December 13, 1912). "Australian Theatricals Told of by George Tallis". Variety. Vol. 29, no. 2. p. 11. ProQuest 1529197198.
  44. ^ "Some Figures and Facts Direct From Chas. Frohman". Variety. Vol. 29, no. 1. December 6, 1912. pp. 10–11. ProQuest 1529177427.
  45. ^ "'Are You a Crook?' Just Misses Fire; What Might Have Been Amusing Farce Is Spoiled by Too Much Haste in Production". The New York Times. May 2, 1913. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  46. ^ "Longacre Theatre: New Playhouse Opens With "Are You a Crook?" Very Tame Farce Plot Lacks Substance and Brisk Action and Has Only Few Bright Lines". New-York Tribune. May 2, 1913. p. 9. ProQuest 575089943.
  47. ^ a b c d e Bloom 2007, p. 151; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 73; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  48. ^ The Broadway League (May 1, 1913). "Are You a Crook? – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Are You a Crook? Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  49. ^ "More Theatres for This City; Beautiful New Playhouses Soon to Be Opened". The New York Times. September 7, 1913. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  50. ^ a b The Broadway League (August 28, 1913). "Adele – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Adele Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  51. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  52. ^ "Guard Realty Interests; New Advisory Council Will Give Aid to Property Owners". The New York Times. April 17, 1914. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  53. ^ "Results at Auction: at 14 Vesey Street". The New York Times. June 19, 1914. p. 19. ISSN 0362-4331. ProQuest 97644713.
  54. ^ "The Auction Market". The Real Estate Record: Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide. Vol. 93, no. 2414. June 20, 1914. p. 1110 – via columbia.edu.
  55. ^ ""A Pair of Sixes" Opens". The New York Times. February 17, 1914. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  56. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 73; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 23.
  57. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 17, 1914). "A Pair of Sixes – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "A Pair of Sixes Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  58. ^ Mack, Willard (November 15, 1914). "The Chorus Girls' Review of Willard Mack's Play; He Records, Among Other Things, All He Heard Them Say About "Kick In" Before He Took to His Heels". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  59. ^ The Broadway League (October 15, 1914). "Kick In – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Kick in Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  60. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 73; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  61. ^ The Broadway League (February 9, 1915). "Inside the Lines – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Inside the Lines Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  62. ^ The Broadway League (May 10, 1915). "A Full House – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "A Full House Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  63. ^ The Broadway League (November 10, 1915). "The Great Lover – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "The Great Lover Broadway @ Waldorf Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  64. ^ "Buy Longacre Theatre; H.H. Frazee and G.M. Anderson to Take Possession on Aug. 1". The New York Times. April 14, 1916. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  65. ^ Montgomery, James (September 15, 1916). "William Collier in a Funny Farce; With More Help Than Usual, He Extracts Much Laughter from "Nothing but the Truth." Presenting the Agonies of One Who Had Wagered He Could Be Absolutely Veracious for a Whole Day". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  66. ^ The Broadway League (September 14, 1916). "Nothing But the Truth – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Nothing But the Truth Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  67. ^ a b "Frazee Sells Interest in Longacre Theater, New York". The Billboard. Vol. 28, no. 48. November 25, 1916. pp. 4, 14. ProQuest 1031518449.
  68. ^ "Legitimate: Frazee Got $128,000". Variety. Vol. 44, no. 13. November 24, 1916. p. 11. ProQuest 1529259066.
  69. ^ a b The Broadway League (August 28, 1917). "Leave It to Jane – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Leave It to Jane Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  70. ^ "'Leave It to Jane,' the College Widow; George Ade's Popular Comedy in a Gay and Tasteful Musical Setting". The New York Times. August 29, 1917. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  71. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 13, 1919). "Adam and Eva – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Adam and Eva Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  72. ^ ""Adam and Eva" for the Longacre". The New York Times. September 9, 1919. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  73. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 151; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 73; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  74. ^ The Broadway League (September 28, 1920). "Pitter Patter – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Pitter Patter Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  75. ^ The Broadway League (January 3, 1921). "The Champion – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "The Champion Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  76. ^ "Ethel Barrymore's Plans". The Billboard. Vol. 34, no. 24. June 17, 1922. p. 21. ProQuest 1031689246.
  77. ^ "Ethel Barrymore to Play At Longacre for 2 Years". New-York Tribune. June 8, 1922. p. 4. ProQuest 576643528.
  78. ^ "Nan Halperin a Love Bandit in Musical Farce: "Little Jessie James" Rides Into Longacre Theater Willi Lively Cast and a New James Boys Band". New-York Tribune. August 16, 1923. p. 6. ProQuest 1237286103.
  79. ^ a b The Broadway League (August 15, 1923). "Little Jessie James – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Little Jessie James Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  80. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 73; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  81. ^ "Shuberts Add Longacre Theater to Their String: Purchase Playhouse in West 48th Street and Obtain Big Loan on Property". New York Herald Tribune. May 11, 1924. p. B1. ProQuest 1112975972.
  82. ^ "Legitimate: Inside Stuff on Legit". Variety. Vol. 75, no. 1. May 21, 1924. p. 46. ProQuest 1475684831.
  83. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 151; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 73–74; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  84. ^ The Broadway League (January 30, 1924). "Moonlight – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
    "Moonlight Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  85. ^ ""Moonlight" Is Tuneful; Glorious Scenery and Energetic Chorus in Le Baron's Comedy". The New York Times. January 31, 1924. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  86. ^ The Broadway League (April 13, 1925). "Mercenary Mary – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
    "Mercenary Mary Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  87. ^ "Tell Me More' Is Bright Musical Play; A Lovely Score, Intelligent Lyrics, Fast Dancing and Ample Comedy in Gaiety's Show". The New York Times. April 14, 1925. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  88. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 151; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 74; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  89. ^ "The Play". The New York Times. September 24, 1925. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  90. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 23, 1925). "The Butter and Egg Man – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "The Butter and Egg Man Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  91. ^ "An American Tragedy' Scores a Triumph; Dramatization of Dreiser's Novel Plays Finely Upon the Emotions and Has a Stirring Finish". The New York Times. October 12, 1926. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  92. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 74; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  93. ^ The Broadway League (October 11, 1926). "An American Tragedy – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
    "An American Tragedy Broadway @ Waldorf Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  94. ^ The Broadway League (September 20, 1927). "The Command to Love – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
    "The Command to Love Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  95. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 74–75; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  96. ^ "'Jarnegan' a Rough and Profane Play; Richard Bennett Acts the Swaggering, Low Lifer Hero in Dramatization of Jim Tully's Novel". The New York Times. September 25, 1928. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  97. ^ "Another Murder Drama; "Hawk Island;" at the Longacre, Has an Entertaining Last Act". The New York Times. September 17, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  98. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 75; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  99. ^ "'Primer for Lovers' Full of Simplicity; Everybody at Week-End Party in Love With Some Other Man's or Woman's Mate". The New York Times. November 19, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  100. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 14–15.
  101. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (March 19, 1930). "The Play; Odyssey of the Rakonitz Family". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  102. ^ "'Nikki' Reappears, With Music". The New York Times. September 30, 1931. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  103. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 151; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 75; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  104. ^ "Blessed Event' Friday; New Comedy Coming to Longacre – 'Monkey' at Mansfield Thursday". The New York Times. February 9, 1932. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  105. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 75; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  106. ^ L.n (April 28, 1933). "Miss Lillian Gish, as a Reincarnation of Lizzie Borden, Appears in "Nine Pine Street."". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  107. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (January 17, 1934). "The Play; Woes of the Child of Divorced Parents is the Theme of "Wednesday's Child."". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  108. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 151; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 75.
  109. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (March 27, 1935). "The Play; 'Waiting for Lefty' and 'Till the Day I Die,' a Double Bill by Clifford Odets". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  110. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  111. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 26, 1935). "Till the Day I Die/Waiting for Lefty – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Till the Day I Die Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Waiting for Lefty Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  112. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (December 10, 1935). "The Play; Clifford Odets and the Group Theatre Discussing the Stalemate of the Middle Class". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  113. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 9, 1935). "Paradise Lost – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Paradise Lost Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  114. ^ "WPA Drops Plans to Rent Longacre; Agreement for Theatre Lease Rescinded After Protests of Stagehand Leaders". The New York Times. May 7, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  115. ^ "News of the Stage; Some Recent Real Estate Transactions – In the Summer Theatres – Other Notes". The New York Times. July 11, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  116. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 75; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  117. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 16, 1936). "Hedda Gabler – Broadway Play – 1936 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Hedda Gabler Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  118. ^ "News of the Stage; 'Hedda Gabler' Opens Tonight – 'Johnny Johnson' Set Back to Thursday – 'All Editions' Postponed". The New York Times. November 16, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  119. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 75; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  120. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (September 27, 1937). "The Play; ' The Lady Has a Heart' as Well as Vincent Price and Elissa Landi—Teatro d'Arte Opens Season". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  121. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 152; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 75; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  122. ^ "News of the Stage; ' On Borrowed Time' Has Its Premiere This Evening--'June Night' Is Deferred From Next Wednesday". The New York Times. February 3, 1938. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  123. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 3, 1938). "On Borrowed Time – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
    "On Borrowed Time Broadway @ Circle in the Square Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  124. ^ "Paul Osborn Play Is Opening Tonight; 'Morning's at Seven' Is the Guild Subscription Offering at the Longacre". The New York Times. November 30, 1939. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  125. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 30, 1939). "Morning's at Seven – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Morning's at Seven Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  126. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 30–31.
  127. ^ a b c d e f g h Bloom 2007, p. 152; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 76; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  128. ^ "'Three's a Family' Will Open Tonight; Farce Comedy by Phoebe and Henry Ephron to Make Its Bow at Longacre Theatre". The New York Times. May 5, 1943. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  129. ^ The Broadway League (May 5, 1943). "Three's a Family – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
    "Three's a Family Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  130. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  131. ^ "News of the Theater: '3 Is a Family' Likely to Move So Mutual Can Take Over Longacre Theater". New York Herald Tribune. April 19, 1944. p. 18B. ProQuest 1283077296.
  132. ^ "News of the Theater: 'Dream With Music' Will Open, With Vera Zorina, at the Majestic Tonight". New York Herald Tribune. May 18, 1944. p. 14A. ProQuest 1282880604.
  133. ^ Zolotow, Sam (May 17, 1944). "City Center Gives 'Newmoon' Tonight; Dorothy Kirsten, John Morgan and Earl Wrightson Head Cast in the Operetta". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  134. ^ "Radio: MBS Expands Office Space Without Cost". The Billboard. Vol. 57, no. 16. April 21, 1945. p. 4. ProQuest 1040009991.
  135. ^ "Winchell Program Tops Hooper List – NBC to Televise Giants Football Games". The New York Times. July 19, 1947. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  136. ^ Beaufort, John (June 17, 1952). "New York's Biggest Free Show: Radio-TV". The Christian Science Monitor. p. 5. ProQuest 508563410.
  137. ^ "Pictures: N.Y. Theatres Hit City's Bid For 2% Bite On All Leases". Variety. Vol. 172, no. 11. November 17, 1948. p. 16. ProQuest 1285927297.
  138. ^ "Radio and Television; Goodman Ace Working on Video Program – Anniversary of Telegram to Be Marked". The New York Times. May 19, 1949. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  139. ^ Zolotow, Sam (August 26, 1953). "Longacre Theatre Going Legitimate; Leased for Radio Since 1944, It Will House New Drama, 'Ladies of the Corridor'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  140. ^ Drutman, Irving (October 18, 1953). "Ladies of the Corridor". New York Herald Tribune. p. D1. ProQuest 1313663171.
  141. ^ Bracker, Milton (October 18, 1953). "About the Lonely 'Ladies of the Corridor'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  142. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 76; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  143. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 152; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  144. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 6, 1954). "Mademoiselle Colombe – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
    "Mademoiselle Colombe Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  145. ^ Calta, Louis (November 19, 1955). "All Critics Unite in Lauding 'Lark'; Seven Drama Reviewers Here Hail Joan of Arc Drama-- Patrons Form Early Line". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  146. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 18, 1955). "Theatre: St. Joan With Radiance; Julie Harris Stars in 'Lark' at Longacre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  147. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 17, 1955). "The Lark – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "The Lark Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  148. ^ Funke, Lewis (November 4, 1957). "Theatre: 'Fair Game'; Dress Trade Comedy Staged at Longacre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  149. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 76; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  150. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 23, 1958). "Theatre: 'Pleasure of His Company'; Delightful Comedy Is Staged at Longacre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  151. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 9, 1961). "Rhinoceros – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Rhinoceros Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  152. ^ Taubman, Howard (January 10, 1961). "Theatre: 'Rhinoceros'; Ionesco Comedy Stars Wallach and Mostel". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  153. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 28, 1961). "Purlie Victorious – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
    "Purlie Victorious Broadway @ Cort Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  154. ^ Taubmanfriedman-Abeles, Howard (October 11, 1963). "The Theater: 'A Case of Libel' Opens; Drama in Courtroom Is Based on Nizer Book". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  155. ^ "Theater: 'Sidney Brustein's Window'; Lorraine Hansberry's Play at Longacre". The New York Times. October 16, 1964. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  156. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 15, 1964). "The Sign in Sidney Brustein's Window – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "The Sign in Sidney Brustein's Window Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  157. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 76; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 34.
  158. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 22, 1966). "Slapstick Tragedy – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
    "Slapstick Tragedy Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  159. ^ Kauffmann, Stanley (February 23, 1966). "Theater: Tennessee Williams Returns; 'Slapstick Tragedy' at the Longacre Margaret Leighton and Kate Reid Star". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  160. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 23, 1966). "Mark Twain Tonight! – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Mark Twain Tonight! Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  161. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 31, 1966). "Gilbert Becaud on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Gilbert Becaud on Broadway Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  162. ^ Alden, Robert (November 1, 1966). "Theater: From French Variety Stage; Gilbert Becaud Opens Show at Longacre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  163. ^ Barnes, Clive (January 26, 1968). "Theater: 'I Never Sang for My Father'; Hal Holbrook in Play by Robert Anderson Staged at the Longacre by Alan Schneider". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  164. ^ Barnes, Clive (February 25, 1969). "Stage: The Special Talents of Theater of the Deaf; Troupe of 14 to Be at Longacre for 2 Weeks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  165. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 76–77.
  166. ^ Goldman, William (1984). The Season: A Candid Look at Broadway. Limelight Series. Limelight Editions. pp. 258–259. ISBN 978-0-87910-023-0.
  167. ^ Calta, Louis (March 14, 1972). "Innovation Is Set at Longacre Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  168. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 152; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 77; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  169. ^ Barnes, Clive (January 21, 1975). "Making the Most of 'Ritz' Steam Bath". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  170. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 20, 1975). "The Ritz – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "The Ritz Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  171. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 77; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  172. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 28, 1976). "The Belle of Amherst – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "The Belle of Amherst Broadway @ Longacre Theatre | Playbill". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  173. ^ Barnes, Clive (May 28, 1976). "Theater for a Holiday Mood". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  174. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 77; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 35.
  175. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 9, 1976). "No Man's Land – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "No Man's Land Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  176. ^ Barnes, Clive (November 10, 1976). "Theater: Pinter's Land of Frozen Discontent". The New York Times. p. 78. ISSN 0362-4331. ProQuest 122802367.
  177. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 24, 1977). "The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  190. ^ "'Play Memory' to Close". The New York Times. April 28, 1984. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
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  199. ^ "'Hizzoner!' Closes". The New York Times. March 7, 1989. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
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  210. ^ "'Truly Blessed' Closing". The New York Times. May 18, 1990. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
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  216. ^ "'Tango Pasion' Closing". The New York Times. April 30, 1993. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
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  228. ^ O'Toole, Fintan (August 13, 1999). "Thriller's deadly dull". Daily News. p. 55. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
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  233. ^ a b Weber, Bruce (July 12, 2001). "Theater Review; Back When Oddballs Roamed the Earth". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
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  236. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 14, 2002). "Russell Simmons Def Poetry Jam – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
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  237. ^ a b "'Def Poetry Jam' Closes". The New York Times. May 6, 2003. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  238. ^ Tavernise, Sabrina (September 26, 2003). "Shuberts Revamp 16 Theaters, Improving Access for Disabled". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  239. ^ "Broadway theaters accessible to disabled". Press and Sun-Bulletin. September 28, 2003. p. 68. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  240. ^ "'Widow' Closes After One Night". The New York Times. November 19, 2003. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  241. ^ Gelder, Lawrence Van (May 12, 2004). "Arts Briefing". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
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  243. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (March 21, 2005). "Marriage as Blood Sport: A No-Win Game". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  245. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (March 31, 2006). "Lisa Kron's 'Well' Opens on Broadway, With Mom Keeping Watch". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  246. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 11, 2007). "Talk Radio – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
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  247. ^ a b Gelder, Lawrence Van (June 19, 2007). "Footnote". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  248. ^ Brantley, Ben (May 5, 2008). "Up, Up and Away (and Watch Those Swinging Doors)". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
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  250. ^ Itzkoff, Dave (December 3, 2008). "'Boeing-Boeing' to Close". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  251. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (August 2, 2009). "Shaking, Rattling and Shimmying, Under a Broadway Disco Ball". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  252. ^ Winer, Linda (August 2, 2009). "Mad not ballroom". Newsday. pp. C15, C17. ISSN 2574-5298. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
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  254. ^ "Production Gross". Playbill. January 6, 2019. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  255. ^ Gilchrist, Tracy E. (August 5, 2019). "The Prom Makes Broadway Herstory by Ending in Actual Same-Sex Marriage". Advocate.com. Retrieved August 6, 2019.
  256. ^ Coleman, Nancy (August 4, 2019). "An Onstage Wedding Brings a Broadway Happy Ending to Life". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  257. ^ Paulson, Michael (March 12, 2020). "Broadway, Symbol of New York Resilience, Shuts Down Amid Virus Threat". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved October 22, 2021.
  258. ^ Meyer, Dan (November 17, 2021). "Diana, the Musical Opens on Broadway November 17 at the Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 13, 2021.
  259. ^ Herrington, Nicole (December 11, 2021). "'Diana, the Musical' to End Broadway Run on Dec. 19". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 12, 2021.
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  261. ^ a b Green, Jesse (April 29, 2022). "Review: In a New 'Macbeth,' Something Wonky This Way Comes". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 30, 2022.
  262. ^ a b The Broadway League. "Leopoldstadt – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved June 8, 2022.
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  263. ^ a b Green, Jesse (October 3, 2022). "Review: In Stoppard's 'Leopoldstadt,' a Memorial to a Lost World". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved October 11, 2022.
  264. ^ a b The Broadway League. "Lempicka – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 10, 2023.
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  265. ^ a b Paulson, Michael (October 30, 2023). "'Lempicka,' New Musical About Art Deco Artist, to Open on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 10, 2023.
  266. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 23.
  267. ^ The Broadway League (December 28, 1914). "Secret Strings – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  268. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  269. ^ The Broadway League (February 7, 1919). "Ghosts – Broadway Play – 1919 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  270. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  271. ^ The Broadway League (August 17, 1921). "Nobody's Money – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  272. ^ The Broadway League (September 26, 1922). "Rose Bernd – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  273. ^ The Broadway League (December 27, 1922). "Romeo and Juliet – Broadway Play – 1922 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  274. ^ The Broadway League (February 10, 1930). "Ritzy – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  275. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  276. ^ The Broadway League (January 16, 1934). "Wednesday's Child – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  277. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  278. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  279. ^ The Broadway League (September 9, 1935). "Kind Lady – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  280. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  281. ^ The Broadway League (April 27, 1939). "Wuthering Heights – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  282. ^ The Broadway League (October 14, 1939). "The Three Sisters – Broadway Play – 1939 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  283. ^ The Broadway League (February 27, 1940). "Leave Her To Heaven – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  284. ^ The Broadway League (September 18, 1940). "Johnny Belinda – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  285. ^ The Broadway League (January 29, 1942). "Hedda Gabler – Broadway Play – 1942 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  286. ^ The Broadway League (March 4, 1954). "The Burning Glass – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  287. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  288. ^ The Broadway League (October 13, 1954). "The Tender Trap – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  289. ^ The Broadway League (September 30, 1953). "Tea and Sympathy – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  290. ^ The Broadway League (April 28, 1955). "The Honeys – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  291. ^ The Broadway League (February 14, 1957). "Holiday for Lovers – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  292. ^ The Broadway League (September 22, 1959). "An Evening With Yves Montand – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  293. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 33.
  294. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 34.
  295. ^ The Broadway League (September 21, 1966). "A Hand Is on the Gate – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  296. ^ The Broadway League (October 15, 1967). "Daphne in Cottage D – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  297. ^ The Broadway League (December 8, 1965). "Cactus Flower – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  298. ^ The Broadway League (April 6, 1970). "Candida – Broadway Play – 1970 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Candida Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  299. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 35.
  300. ^ The Broadway League (November 15, 1970). "Les Blancs – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Les Blancs Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  301. ^ The Broadway League (December 18, 1970). "The Me Nobody Knows – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "The Me Nobody Knows Broadway @ Helen Hayes Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  302. ^ The Broadway League (January 26, 1972). "The Sign in Sidney Brustein's Window – Broadway Play – 1972 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "The Sign in Sidney Brustein's Window Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  303. ^ The Broadway League (April 7, 1974). "Thieves – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Thieves Broadway @ Broadhurst Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  304. ^ The Broadway League (September 14, 1976). "Checking Out – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Checking Out Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  305. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 36.
  306. ^ The Broadway League (April 5, 1979). "Faith Healer – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Faith Healer Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  307. ^ The Broadway League (May 3, 1979). "Bosoms and Neglect – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Bosoms and Neglect Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  308. ^ The Broadway League (July 31, 1979). "But Never Jam Today – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "But Never Jam Today Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  309. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 37.
  310. ^ The Broadway League (October 19, 1993). "Tony Bennett: Steppin' Out on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  311. ^ The Broadway League (April 7, 1994). "Medea – Broadway Play – 1994 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Medea Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  312. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 78.
  313. ^ Itzkoff, Dave (December 3, 2008). "'Boeing-Boeing' to Close". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  314. ^ The Broadway League (April 18, 2010). "La Cage aux Folles – Broadway Musical – 2010 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "La Cage aux Folles Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  315. ^ Itzkoff, Dave (April 6, 2011). "What a Drag: Broadway Revival of 'La Cage aux Folles' Is Closing". ArtsBeat. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  316. ^ The Broadway League (October 27, 2011). "Chinglish – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
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  317. ^ Rohter, Larry (January 16, 2012). "'Chinglish' to Close". ArtsBeat. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  318. ^ The Broadway League (April 11, 2012). "Magic/Bird – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
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  319. ^ Piepenburg, Erik (May 1, 2012). "'Magic/Bird' to Hang Up Its Laces". ArtsBeat. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  320. ^ The Broadway League (November 14, 2012). "The Performers – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "The Performers Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  321. ^ Heller, Scott (November 16, 2012). "A Real Quickie: 'The Performers' to Close on Sunday". ArtsBeat. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  322. ^ The Broadway League (August 8, 2013). "First Date – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "First Date Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  323. ^ Piepenburg, Erik (August 13, 2013). "In Performance: Zachary Levi and Krysta Rodriguez of 'First Date'". ArtsBeat. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  324. ^ The Broadway League (April 16, 2014). "Of Mice and Men – Broadway Play – 2014 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Of Mice and Men Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  325. ^ Kozinn, Allan (July 23, 2014). "About to Close on Broadway, 'Of Mice and Men' to Live On in British Broadcast". ArtsBeat. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  326. ^ The Broadway League (September 28, 2014). "You Can't Take It With You – Broadway Play – 2014 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "You Can't Take It With You Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  327. ^ Piepenburg, Erik (December 30, 2014). "In Performance: James Earl Jones of 'You Can't Take It With You'". ArtsBeat. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  328. ^ The Broadway League (November 8, 2015). "Allegiance – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
    "Allegiance Broadway @ Longacre Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  329. ^ Isherwood, Charles (November 9, 2015). "Review: 'Allegiance,' a Musical History Lesson About Interned Japanese-Americans". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  330. ^ The Broadway League (November 1, 2016). "A Bronx Tale The Musical – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
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